Coach Maze Joins USTA Northern California's Hall of Fame

As a junior standout, All-American and the head coach of UC Davis' women's team, tennis has played an intricate role in the life of Bill Maze (left in photo), USTA Northern California's newest hall of fame member.
 
As a junior standout, All-American and the head coach of UC Davis' women's team, tennis has played an intricate role in the life of Bill Maze (left in photo), USTA Northern California's newest hall of fame member.
 

May 14, 2014

DAVIS, Calif. - UC Davis women's tennis head coach Bill Maze will return to a familiar environment when he, Susan Mehmedbasich Wright, Rich Anderson, John Hubbell and Bob Walsh become the newest members of the United States Tennis Association's (USTA) Northern California Hall of Fame.

Scheduled for Thursday, July 31, this year's induction ceremony will take place during the Bank of the West Classic hosted by Stanford, Maze's alma mater. USTA Northern California will begin selling tickets for this historic event on its website, www.ustanorcal.com, beginning in early June.

"I'm flattered and extremely honored," said Maze regarding his induction.

Maze came to UC Davis from nearby University of the Pacific where he was the head coach of the women's tennis team for five years. While coaching in Stockton, he took an unranked squad that was sixth in the Big West Conference to a second-place conference finish in four of his five years on campus.

The Tigers also ended the 1994-95 year ranked No. 34 nationally in the Division I poll; that placing earned Maze honors as the Big West Conference's Co-Coach of the Year.

Named Coach of the Year on another three occasions, Maze, who recently completed his 19th season at the helm of UC Davis women's tennis, guided his teams to eight NCAA Division II championship appearances.

Throughout his program's intense four-year transition to Division I competition, it was Maze who set the program's academic and athletic standards from day one, and prepared his players accordingly to handle the jump in skills and talent from one level to another.

Since UC Davis joined the Big West Conference in 2007, Maze's teams have won 83 overall and 27 league matches; his most recent team finished the 2013-14 season in fourth place with a 12-10 overall record and 4-3 mark against conference opponents.


 

 

Throughout the Aggies' seven-year Big West tenure, Maze's student-athletes received all-Big West honors on 27 occasions-athletic success that carries deeper meaning when considering the workload and demands of UC Davis' rigorous curricula.  

Maze's success at UC Davis is the latest chapter of a storied tennis career that also includes All-American accolades received as a Stanford student-athlete, two ATP doubles titles and world rankings in both singles and doubles.

With the support of his father, George, who loved the game of tennis and his mother, Sheila, an avid tennis player herself, Bill developed into a junior standout. In 1972, Maze was the top-ranked 16-year-old in the country and captured a national 16-and-under title. Two years later, he earned a runner-up finish at the 18-and-under championships, also held in Kalamazoo, Mich.

Maze's on-court success continued when he arrived to Stanford and competed for its men's tennis team. In addition to earning All-American recognition on three occasions, Maze helped the Cardinal earn back-to-back NCAA titles in 1977 and '78-he also serve as the team's captain throughout both championship-winning campaigns.

Besides earning the first of two NCAA championships, Maze received the Rafael Osuna Award, one of the most prestigious honors in college tennis bestowed to a player for his sportsmanship, competitiveness and contributions to the game during his junior season at Stanford.

It was here where his coach, Dick Gould, partnered Maze with John McEnroe; together, the two enjoyed a high level of doubles success at both the amateur and professional level.

With McEnroe, Maze learned to always compete no matter what situation the duo faced. "We'd get up a break, I think I'd naturally relax a bit. He'd be nervous, twitching. He'd say, 'Willie, let's get another break, I want to get out of here.' " 

Throughout his six-year ATP career, Maze earned a top-200 singles ranking and reached as high as No. 87, competing with McEnroe once again, on the organization's doubles list.